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CCI
Thursday, 02 July 2015 15:51

UK businesses lack policies on BYOD

Two out of five UK businesses have no data security policies governing employees own mobile devices finds new research

Chris Halbard EVP and President, International at cloud solution business Synchronoss takes our 10 minute Q&A test.

Ed Macnair explains why organisations need their web security to be ‘cloud application proof’ and how cloud application control can avert risks to your business.

Ed Macnair explores how you transparently enforce security policies without intervening in the end user experience that people have grown to enjoy from cloud related services

Monday, 26 January 2015 09:36

VDI – Why is it still virtually untapped?

Virtual desktops are a compelling solution to a long-term IT headache, however the adoption of virtual desktops remains low, we look at some of the reasons why.

IT Budgets are set to grow by just one percent in 2015, so here are 5 best practices to use the data already held in the business to advance recruitment strategies, drive revenue growth and develop the creative minds of everyone from IT to HR.

Learn why you need to create a corporate-approved cloud architecture with enterprise security and controls when designing your bring your own device strategy

We look at why cloud-based unified communications is the way forward and look at some of the strategies to help ensure the technology fits in with your network infrastructure.

Wednesday, 03 December 2014 11:23

Cost savings drive businesses to the cloud

Cost is the big driver for cloud take up according to a survey of senior executives and mobile developers.

Breaches due to mobile devices are on the up, with two-thirds of large enterprises believing that mobile devices are the weakest link in their security strategies

Employees are driving the adoption of desktop virtualisation, remote access and cloud-based collaboration and services as employees become more and more cloud savvy, but just a third of businesses can handle the requests 

The mixture of bring your own device policies for tablets and phones and virtualised desktops is creating new licensing headaches for IT directors. Software asset management consultant Jelle Wijndelts looks at some of the issues in managing licenses in your new cloud based systems.  

NaviSite has partnered with VMware to produce an Enterprise Mobility Management solution to complement their cloud and hosting services.

Andy Travers explains why employees are increasingly the weak link in a businesses’ security policy and why IT managers need to develop strong policies and strategies to take account of the personal cloud.

Mark Keepax explains why service catalogues have the potential to save businesses substantial sums and how they can create a more effective solution to a managed mobile strategy than an app store.

Friday, 25 April 2014 10:55

Differentiation in the cloud market

Ted Roller discusses the opportunities the humble app is bringing to service providers in the cloud – and how they might be missing out.

Alex Fuller - CEO and Co-Founder of CloudSense cloud integrators, talks about cloud and Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) @cloudsense @AlexintheCloud

Tuesday, 18 February 2014 11:50

Why Cloud 2.0 will be everything-as-a-service

David Grimes, Chief Technology Officer at NaviSite explains what the next generation of cloud services will be and how they will differ from the current infrastructure-as-a-service solutions The cloud computing market has matured significantly in the past two to three years, becoming almost synonymous with infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS). But if the rapid adoption of IaaS was Cloud 1.0, what does the future hold for cloud beyond IaaS and what services will we see being enabled by cloud in the future? Primarily cloud adoption was driven by cost. Not always in the sense that switching to cloud would reduce spend immediately, but the benefits of moving from a CAPEX to OPEX model was, and continues to be, a compelling proposition to businesses. Other factors have also helped to shape today’s cloud industry. These include the maturation of virtualisation technologies, the ever increasing capabilities of the underlying hardware platforms, and the expertise which service providers have developed in delivering robust, secure solutions using a shared infrastructure model. It is this attraction to ‘as-a-service’ delivery that will continue to fuel the next evolution in cloud services, or Cloud 2.0. Over the coming years we will see many existing offerings adapting to an as-a-service model enabling greater levels of flexibility and operational efficiency.

Creating the virtualised desktop as a service

One emerging opportunity in the as-a-service suit is Desktop-as-a-Service (DaaS). Previously a model that had limited success in the market, it is now experiencing increasing demand. This trend can be explained by businesses’ move towards ‘bring your own device’ (BYOD) policies, which in itself is a trend that has resulted from a combination of different elements. Firstly, the current generation of employees has expectations of personal choice when it comes to devices in the office. A company supplied mobile phone simply doesn’t cut it for many workers. They want freedom to choose their own — often more advanced — smartphones or tablets. Also, the trend toward a more global, distributed workforce means people need to work where they want, how they want. The flexible nature of desktop-as-a-service helps address many of these issues. For many companies their intellectual property (IP) is the lifeblood of their business, so protecting access to it is critical. DaaS brings with it a host of information security benefits and many companies now use it to help mitigate IP control concerns. Some of the businesses that most benefit from DaaS use large numbers of overseas contractors to work on specific projects for limited periods of time. The business wants to ensure that contractors have access to the source code but not allow them to copy it for use outside of the organisation, onto a USB stick or printer for example. By using a hosted DaaS model for their contracted developers they are able to provide the tools they need and at the same time retain more control, restricting and remotely cutting off access as soon as needed. Other drivers of DaaS are the advances in protocols and networks that have made the hosted desktop experience more acceptable, and in some cases superior, to the traditional desktop. For enterprises, DaaS represents an opportunity to satisfy their employees BYOD desires, replace CAPEX oriented desktop refresh cycles with a more predictable OPEX model, reduce overall IT support costs, and more readily address security and compliance needs.

Storage is defining the cloud future

Another area that will form a significant part of the Cloud 2.0 as-a-service future is storage. Exponential growth in storage needs will be driven by regulatory and compliance requirements, an increase in mobile devices, and the unprecedented growth of unstructured data. It would be difficult to have a discussion about storage today without using the phrase ‘Big Data’. Almost everything we do creates data, and as a result storage requirements are growing rapidly. This rate of growth cannot be met using traditional procurement methods. Storage-as-a-service (STaaS), where servers can be provisioned via the cloud, enables companies to add storage at the click of a mouse rather than the week and months it previously took to get new servers up and running. The clear business advantages in terms of speed of delivery and flexibility that STaaS provides, means that this area has the potential to grow significantly over the coming years.

The (r)evolution that is Cloud 2.0

Aside from DaaS and STaaS there is huge opportunity to transform other traditional methods of service delivery into an as-a-service model. All of these services will embody the essential characteristics of cloud and will likely be delivered from the common platform which defined the original Cloud 1.0. For example, many applications will benefit from both a cost model and operational efficiency perspective through database-as-a service offerings. The new generation of NoSQL databases are much better suited to cloud applications as they are designed to deal with multiple small requests and work in a distributed, horizontally scalable model – several databases spread across different geographies in the cloud. We could also soon see increased adoption of platform-as-a-service (Paas), but that will be dependent on an evolution in applications, which is clearly underway but likely to be a bit slower growing in the immediate future. Disaster recovery is yet another area where the move away from traditional hardware-based solutions will enable the infrastructure to provide additional capabilities. While any complete disaster recovery plan will include considerations at the application layer, the infrastructure itself can do more today than ever before. In this context of Cloud 2.0 it is best to think of cloud as a set of guiding principles as opposed to a term that defines a specific offering or capability. Our vision for Cloud 2.0 will see the evolutionary move from a pure IaaS to a comprehensive suite of as-a-service offerings. To that end, the specific offerings identified here should be considered representative, not exhaustive. The market is continuing to accelerate and we will likely see additional opportunities to apply the as-a-service mindset to legacy and new offerings.

About the author

David Grimes is the CTO of NaviSite and has responsibility for the overall technology vision and direction of the company and leads the Research and Development. Grimes moved to NaviSite in 2002 through the acquisition of Clear Blue where he was responsible for overseeing all internal and operational support systems. Prior to that, he was the lead software engineer at AppliedTheory.

Tuesday, 11 February 2014 17:47

Why Cloud 2.0 will be everything-as-a-service

David Grimes, Chief Technology Officer at NaviSite explains what the next generation of cloud services will be and how they will differ from the current infrastructure-as-a-service solutions

David Milot from Unisys consulting explores the problems faced by IT departments by BYOD and BYOA and looks at how the emerging trend of workspace as a service can mitigate some of the issues

Cisco and Intel find line of business departments are using the cloud directly and the knock-on effect is a long-term reduction in IT budgets

A new survey from Cisco Consulting Services and Intel shows the rising adoption of cloud services is moving IT budgets out of IT and into the rest of the business, and is forcing IT departments to adopt a more collaborative and innovative approach rather than a top-down approach.

The report “The Impact of Cloud on IT Consumption Models” report – based on a global survey of over 4,000 IT decision makers – suggests the UK is at a tipping point in IT spending as cloud uptake increases. While 43% of IT funding currently comes from lines of business (LOB), 59% of respondents predict that this will rise. As a proportion, the cloud represents almost a quarter of total IT spend (23%), with that figure expected to rise to 27% by 2016.

The report describes the rise of cloud as “fundamentally changing how British businesses consume technologies,” and found that in a majority of organisations, control of IT planning and purchasing is increasingly being shifted to LOBs such as HR, sales, and R&D. Their rising influence represents a marked departure from the traditional “top-down” approach, forcing IT departments to adapt.

Given that more nearly three-quarters (70%) of respondents believe IT planning will increasingly involve stakeholders from LOBs, and 59% believe purchasing authority will also eventually reside with LOBs, the role of the IT department looks set to change. While they may once have planned, purchased, and implemented entire projects, 70% of UK respondents believe that in the future, they will serve as “brokers” of services. With this new role comes new challenges: More than three out of four (77%) respondents said integrating cloud services with in-house IT systems is now their main concern.

BYOD and IT as a Service drive the cloud change

The research identified two key drivers of this push for greater control among LOBs:

  • The popularity of bring-your-own-device (BYOD) schemes – 82% of respondents expect to be able to use an increasing number and variety of devices.
  • IT as a service (ITaaS) — Nearly three-quarters (72%) increasingly expect to access IT through a “self-service” model, supporting the general trend towards delivery of IT as a service.

According to the report the principle of a self-service approach is that LOBs will always have a number of different options for their IT services, meaning IT departments effectively have to compete with third-party suppliers, outsourcers, and vendors in order to “win” these internal customers. Evidence of IT departments losing out to competition is already apparent: almost half (49%) of UK respondents have seen an increase in “rogue purchasing” by LOBs over the past two years – higher than both the European and North American averages.

“2014 looks to be the year that LOBs overtake IT departments in terms of spending. Almost every conceivable business function can now be delivered from the cloud as a service, empowering departments to seize control of their own spending instead of waiting for a nod from IT,” said Jo Laking, UKI cloud leader, Cisco.

“As we move forward, IT teams must be able to translate internal teams’ business requirements into appropriate technical solutions, and then integrate these private/public offerings securely and efficiently with existing infrastructure. Furthermore, we’ll soon see the influence of LOBs extend beyond merely planning and purchasing. As their share of funding increases, LOBs will begin to play a much more active role in the operation and governance of these internal systems, meaning it will be impossible for IT for survive without learning to collaborate.”

Cisco and Intel find line of business departments are using the cloud directly and the knock-on effect is a long-term reduction in IT budgets

A new survey from Cisco Consulting Services and Intel shows the rising adoption of cloud services is moving IT budgets out of IT and into the rest of the business, and is forcing IT departments to adopt a more collaborative and innovative approach rather than a top-down approach.

The report “The Impact of Cloud on IT Consumption Models” report – based on a global survey of over 4,000 IT decision makers – suggests the UK is at a tipping point in IT spending as cloud uptake increases. While 43% of IT funding currently comes from lines of business (LOB), 59% of respondents predict that this will rise. As a proportion, the cloud represents almost a quarter of total IT spend (23%), with that figure expected to rise to 27% by 2016.

The report describes the rise of cloud as “fundamentally changing how British businesses consume technologies,” and found that in a majority of organisations, control of IT planning and purchasing is increasingly being shifted to LOBs such as HR, sales, and R&D. Their rising influence represents a marked departure from the traditional “top-down” approach, forcing IT departments to adapt.

Given that more nearly three-quarters (70%) of respondents believe IT planning will increasingly involve stakeholders from LOBs, and 59% believe purchasing authority will also eventually reside with LOBs, the role of the IT department looks set to change. While they may once have planned, purchased, and implemented entire projects, 70% of UK respondents believe that in the future, they will serve as “brokers” of services. With this new role comes new challenges: More than three out of four (77%) respondents said integrating cloud services with in-house IT systems is now their main concern.

BYOD and IT as a Service drive the cloud change

The research identified two key drivers of this push for greater control among LOBs:

  • The popularity of bring-your-own-device (BYOD) schemes – 82% of respondents expect to be able to use an increasing number and variety of devices.
  • IT as a service (ITaaS) — Nearly three-quarters (72%) increasingly expect to access IT through a “self-service” model, supporting the general trend towards delivery of IT as a service.

According to the report the principle of a self-service approach is that LOBs will always have a number of different options for their IT services, meaning IT departments effectively have to compete with third-party suppliers, outsourcers, and vendors in order to “win” these internal customers. Evidence of IT departments losing out to competition is already apparent: almost half (49%) of UK respondents have seen an increase in “rogue purchasing” by LOBs over the past two years – higher than both the European and North American averages.

“2014 looks to be the year that LOBs overtake IT departments in terms of spending. Almost every conceivable business function can now be delivered from the cloud as a service, empowering departments to seize control of their own spending instead of waiting for a nod from IT,” said Jo Laking, UKI cloud leader, Cisco.

“As we move forward, IT teams must be able to translate internal teams’ business requirements into appropriate technical solutions, and then integrate these private/public offerings securely and efficiently with existing infrastructure. Furthermore, we’ll soon see the influence of LOBs extend beyond merely planning and purchasing. As their share of funding increases, LOBs will begin to play a much more active role in the operation and governance of these internal systems, meaning it will be impossible for IT for survive without learning to collaborate.”

 

One third of IT departments are putting their business at risk by failing to have data retention policies in place, according to Peter Groucutt, managing director of Databarracks.

 

Almost half of all of businesses require IT decision makers to evaluate cloud applications as part of every software procurement process, but cloud has some hidden dangers that many businesses are falling foul of

 

David Blair, VP of products at LogMeIn, examines the difficult balance IT leaders must strike to give employees access to the applications they want, while placating any security concerns

 

Toshiba launches Toshiba Cloud Client Manager (TCCM) a new end-point management cloud service and Mobile Device Manager (MDM) and updates Toshiba Smart Client Manager (TSCM) to version 2.0

Dell has launched One Identity Cloud Access Manager to address some of the key areas facing business today namely; big data, BYOD, cloud, network security, and compliance.


Nick Arnold investigates the phenomena of Bring-Your-Own-Device (BYOD) and what IT departments need to doto approach the potential security and risk


ALVEA Services, the managed security and Cloud-based computing solutions provider, has announced enhancements to its ALVEA Cloud Attached Storage service to address the increasing demand for enterprise mobility and BYOD solutions.

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